Archives for posts with tag: Mark Leckey

Thinking in shapes.

Across RCA is a great scheme where students get to do something completely different for a week.

I went to the Princes School of Traditional Arts and joined the current talented MA students for lessons in geometry and biomorphic patterns.

1411 geometry class 2

We made platonic solids from sticks and thin card.

1411 Geometry class

Geo = earth, metry = measure.

Having recently read Raymond Williams ‘People of the Black Mountains’ which tells stories of a burgeoning civilization spanning thousands of years it was interesting to connect the theories of the early measurers in his book with what I was learning, to think about this knowledge in terms of history.

The teaching was very much from a spiritual perspective, highlighting the balance and harmony in the universe present in mathematical relationships.

I found these ideas quite relevant to the ways I have been thinking about my work. I am thinking of introducing pattern into my work and I want the shapes to have meaning, to be from the very structures that the world is built from. If I am searching for paradise in the everyday then looking at the construction of the universe seems a good place to start.

Heaven and earth linked by consciousness.

1411 gallerie Nadine Feront (1)

This painting, done using a brush with just a single hair, makes me think of stone circles.

Writing this blog helps me pin my thoughts down. To pause and consider what I have recently seen or read or discovered feeds my practice.

Coming back to think about the history of clearing our space in the forest.

Building – burial – marriage – ancestors – (wild men)

The forest as dark, dangerous and profane as opposed to enchanted, sacred, shelter.

I haven’t made this work yet.

This year the RCA Printmaking study trip was to Belgium.

We visited Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven at her studio in Antwerp.

Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven

Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven

Her interests are in the intertwining of the female body, mysticism and technology.

Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven

Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven

She believes she could almost be a reincarnation of the mystic Marguerite Porete in that she shares so many mutual concerns.

Porete was executed for heresy as a result of her poetic mysticism in  Le Miroir des âmes simples anéanties (The Mirror of the Simple Souls Who Are Annihilated and Remain Only in Will and Desire of Love) which lists seven stages of annihilation of the soul necessary to become one with God which fell foul of current Christian thinking.

Again the mirror.

We visited Museum Plantin Moretus home of the oldest printing presses in the world.

1411 Museum Plantin Moretus (1)

The current exhibition was Dissected Anatomy

1411 Museum Plantin Moretus 3

The sphere is a symbol of unity and completeness

1411 Museum Plantin Moretus 2

I have asked my optician for the scan images of my eye to use in my work

1411 eye

Always searching.

We visited M HKA Museum of Modern Art Antwerp

There were beautiful evocative photographs taken in Moscow’s Museum of Natural History by Russian artist Olga Chernysheva. The illumination of the light boxes emphasized the illumination of the museum display cases within, making the images ethereal and other worldly.

Olga Chernysheva Cactus Seller 2009

Olga Chernysheva Cactus Seller 2009

Social realism. Hans Eijkelboom set himself very clear rules about what he would photograph each day.

Hans Eijkelboom Fotonotities  (1992 - 2007)

Hans Eijkelboom Fotonotities (1992 – 2007)

From the swarming figures on the streets he picks out the individual and then places them back in the group setting up taxonomies and cultural relationships

Hans Eijkelboom Fotonotities

Hans Eijkelboom Fotonotities

Faith and hope – the fulfilment of desire must never happen – it must always be in the future

Francis Alys When Faith Moves Mountains: Lima, Peru

Francis Alys When Faith Moves Mountains: Lima, Peru

We had a trip to La Centre de la Gravure et de l’Image Imprimee in Louviere. A soulless print archive in a soulless place.

Like a crematorium built for function on the outskirts of town, it seemed displaced from locality and devoid of the spirituality of the temple or shrine. An archive seems a sad place somehow.

The theory is, it’s only a resting place.

1411 first proof chapel

First proof of soft ground etching – Chapel of Rest

Wiels Contemporary Art Centre had a big retrospective of Mark Leckey with the wonderful title –  Lending Enchantment to Vulgar Materials

There was a new interpretation of the Universal Addressability of Dumb Things. This time the material icons had been 3D printed. The status of the object has been questioned throughout the various incarnations of this exhibition. Where does the aura lie?

Mark Leckey Lending Enchantment to Vulgar Materials

Mark Leckey

Ana Torfs ‘Echolalia’ exhibition also at Wiels Contemporary Art Centre was tantalising for me. It contained research and imagery that I am drawn to yet the presentation of so much factual text alongside turned it into something a bit dry.

Ana Torfs

Ana Torfs

The installation piece ‘The Parrot and the Nightingale, a Phantasmagoria’ worked well

and I liked the vignette images of islands like the view through a telescope but the text was intrusive

Ana Torfs

Ana Torfs

I can understand why you might want to include all your research, she talks about an archaeology of knowledge

Ana Torfs

Ana Torfs

I have a similar problem, I am grappling with how to make known my research and narrative in my own work

It’s hard to make it evident in the image but I don’t think it matters that everything should be disclosed, ideas should be sparked and then threads can be followed that may lead elsewhere even.

French artist Emmanuelle Laine at c-o-m-p-o-s-i-t-e gallery in Brussels had made a colourful intervention creating a sculpture on site that she then photographed and repeated around the gallery walls. She has found a way to include her research and incidental thoughts in her work, her tools both for process and inspiration are left scattered around the space in evidence

Emmanuelle Laine

Emmanuelle Laine

The traces of construction and thought processes are not discarded or hidden – the sculpture becomes an exploded view of the artists brain during the creative process

Emmanuelle Laine

Emmanuelle Laine

Great to see some more video work of Philippa Kuligowski at New Sensations.

She has a wonderful way of collaging imagery and media in original ways to create engaging magical narratives.

Philippa Kuligowski The Plover and the Crocodile

Philippa Kuligowski The Plover and the Crocodile

The Plover and the Crocodile link to film

Other work I liked also at New Sensations –

Vivien Zhang Porcupine Hair

Vivien Zhang Porcupine Hair

Nicholas Johnson Mildew Swoosh

Nicholas Johnson Mildew Swoosh

Felicity Hammond Restore to Factory Settings

Felicity Hammond Restore to Factory Settings

 

Ben Woodeson  That Bit From the Omen, Yes That Bit

Ben Woodeson That Bit From The Omen, Yes That Bit

I haven’t seen The Omen so I don’t know that bit.

I am looking at invisible planes made visible, the threat of collapse and the possibility of violence.

The new media animation by Charles Richardson was intriguing. It was not a hologram. The figure turned and writhed out of the screen in 3D but no glasses were  involved –  it was like a ghost had entered the room  – it was uncanny

Charles Richardson Rehearsal

Charles Richardson Rehearsal

In an inspiring lecture Esther Teichmann made suggestions of work to check out including Marie Darrieussecq ‘My Phantom Husband’, Claire Denis ‘Beau Travail’ and Janet Cardiff and George Bures Millar ‘Blue Hawaii Bar’ link here – Searching for the light in an evocative installation in a Victorian water reservoir.

All the time I thought I was looking at landscape but maybe I was looking for what was held within the landscape. The nooks and crannies where the myths hide.

 

 

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The main focus at school has been preparing for the Fine Art Work In Progress Show. There is a nice tension of activity in the studios and workshops with everyone busy for the deadlines.

I have been working on my ‘Paradise on Earth’ series.

Paradise Road SW4 test print

Paradise Road SW4 test print

I wasn’t happy with the screen prints I had done on paper using grayscale and then a strip of colour added by mono-printing. For this to be successful it will need a separate screen making for the strip, using paper to block off the strip means the lines aren’t that clean. Also the colours needed more attention.

However I was happy with the screen prints I did onto polyester. Using opaque matt grey textile ink through a fine mesh screen meant I had to wash the screen after every print and the image did disintegrate on the screen but I was able to get a few copies to work with.

Paradise Road SW4 ve 1

Screen print over sublimation on polyester

Printing the grey ink heavily over the high saturation colour on polyester blocked areas off leaving jewel like glimpses between the grey. I lost some detail with the heavy ink but ran another layer over with print room ink in a darker colour which brought it back a bit. The clash of the dot matrix pattern on the screen mesh and the fabric weave created a moire effect which gives the image a sort of 3D effect and also looks a bit like driving rain.

Paradise Road SW4 ve2

Screen print on polyester

I printed grey straight onto white polyester leaving a blank strip for the colour sublimation print. Working with the polyester spray-mounted onto thin card to keep the image square I used the heat-press to add the strip of colour.

Big relief once I had managed to mount these prints onto aluminium. I used 3M positionable adhesive on a roll. It was a tricky process to get it straight with no creases and took most of a weekend to get both done and the edges cut and sealed off.

Both pieces work with the idea of a glimpse of colour through the grey – a space for the imagination to flourish within even a grim urban landscape. The idea of the plastic palm trees as a symbol for paradise. How fulfilling is this idea of association.

I enjoyed the film Gravity at the IMAX and have tried to hold in my head the backdrop of space – drop upon drop of light. The effects were amazing, really vertiginous and the relentless tension was exhausting. I am planning a new piece of work where I aim to create the feeling of the universe, some vast space. I am going to try this with acquatint on a large steel plate. I spent a whole day sanding the plate which is almost a metre square. I was in so much pain at then end but hopefully it will be worth it if I can get a good range of tone and depth.

Gravity

Gravity

Floating in space will be an image derived from a photograph of Paradise Forum, Birmingham and added as a photo-etching.  I was inspired by the two girls sitting on the steps, they look like they are ready to leave this grey version of paradise. It’s easy to forget the magnitude of where we are.

Paradise Forum

Paradise Forum

Some time ago…

A series of 8 short films were screened at the BFI London film festival under the heading Bizarre Ride.
They came under the thrill section of the programme, a new way of labeling the films rather than by country that has been adopted by the London Film Festival in the last couple of years. Since the nice lady with the boots was replaced by someone who thought a trailer featuring pop corn consumption was appropriate.
I’m not sure any labels should be applied. Alphabetical would be fine and leave people to decide for themselves if the film was a thrill or a dare. The Spanish film ‘That wasn’t me’ was terrifying rather than thrilling in the knowledge that it reflected the reality of child soldiers and the horrors they are forced to commit and endure.

'That wasn't me' directed by Esteban Crespo

‘That wasn’t me’ directed by Esteban Crespo

The beautiful French entry ‘5 metres 80’ was an entrancing spectacle of gawky giraffes performing elegant acrobatic dives into a deserted swimming pool.

'5 Metres 80' directed by Nicolas Devereaux

‘5 Metres 80’ directed by Nicolas Devereaux

Maxine Peake gave a wonderful strong performance in ‘Keeping up with the Joneses’ which swerved from comedy to gore while trying to reveal the undercurrent of repressed emotions.

'Keeping up with the Joneses' directed by Michael Pearce

‘Keeping up with the Joneses’ directed by Michael Pearce

‘The Slaughter’ saw a father and son bonding through a harsh lesson in how to kill and butcher a pig. Vegetarians look away now. Some people did walk out  -so was this more upsetting than the rape and bludgeoning we had seen in ‘It wasn’t me’ or was it just a coincidence they had to leave.

'The Slaughter' directed by Jason B. Kohl

‘The Slaughter’ directed by Jason B. Kohl

‘The Double’ Richard Ayoade’s second film turned out to be a decidedly grey comedy.

Set in an indeterminate period a sickly light pervaded the film, along with a musty stench of deprivation and humiliation.

The Double

The Double

It was I suppose a story of self discovery, facing your true self. The horror of subjugation went on so long and the final denouement was so brief that we were still left with the grey feeling at the end.

I am however glad I saw it, I might even watch it again.

I visited Daniel Silver’s ‘Dig’ on Halloween. It was suitably other worldly.

Daniel Silver 'Dig'

Daniel Silver ‘Dig’

Set in the Old Odeon Site just off Tottenham Court Road was quite extraordinary to move between two such different locations in such a short journey.

Daniel Silver 'Dig'

Daniel Silver ‘Dig’

Visiting at dusk seemed to be a good time to go.

Daniel Silver 'Dig'

Daniel Silver ‘Dig’

Unearthly shadows added to the aura of mystery.

Daniel Silver 'Dig'

Daniel Silver ‘Dig’

The raw bones of the building above revealed a brutal concrete structure which seemed fitting with the atmosphere created below.

It was the sort of building we associate with hot dusty countries where it is uncertain whether the building is in a state of construction or destruction and history is ancient and full of mythology.

Daniel Silver 'Dig'

Daniel Silver ‘Dig’

Daniel Silver 'Dig'

Daniel Silver ‘Dig’

At the entrance to the site multiples of artefacts were displayed.

Mass produced and slightly alien in appearance.

Daniel Silver 'Dig'

Daniel Silver ‘Dig’

These collections in the brightly lit arena do not possess the magic of the lower excavations. Like any object removed from its archeological source something is lost.

Like mass produced souvenirs.

Daniel Silver 'Dig'

Daniel Silver ‘Dig’

It was interesting to hear what Mark Leckey had to say about his exhibition The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things during his talk at the RCA.

The exhibition promised a kind of ‘techno-animism’, where the inanimate comes to life, returning us to ‘an archaic state of being, to aboriginal landscapes of fabulous hybrid creatures, where images are endowed with divine powers, and even rocks and trees have names’

In his lecture, In the Long Tail (2008), Leckey describes the ways in which the ‘entire vastness’ of the internet caters for the desires of an infinitely long tail of consumers with minority interests.  As modern technology becomes ever more pervasive and sophisticated, objects begin to communicate with us: phones speak back, refrigerators suggest recipes, and websites seem to predict what we want.  While this takes us into the realms of science fiction, it also boomerangs us back into the past and a more animistic relationship to the things around us.

Mark Leckey The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things

Mark Leckey The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things

‘The status of objects’, Leckey argues, ‘is changing, and we are once again in thrall to an enchanted world full of transformations and correspondences, a wonderful instability between things animate and inanimate, animal and human, mental and material’.  Our hyper-rationalism of modern technology has paradoxically produced its opposite, an ‘irrational’ magical realm – or as Marshall McLuhan, communication theorist, described “a resonating world akin to the old tribal echo chamber where magic will live again”.

For the exhibition he was able to request all sorts of objects that he had only previously seen on his computer screen. He chose items that possessed some quality or aura that made them in some way magical. Once the objects were delivered to the gallery though he seemed a bit disappointed when he finally came face to face with them. He seemed to be saying that he preferred them as images on his computer screen where he had the possibility to transform them though software wizardry. To make them vibrate with digital life.

He was fascinated by the digital animation Viral Vacuum.

Viral Vacuum

Viral Vacuum

Particularly the ability of the cat to pass through glass. The rules of the solid world do not entirely apply.

Viral Vacuum cat

Viral Vacuum cat

He should check out Dynamo magician impossible.

Dynamo Magician Impossible

Dynamo Magician Impossible

The final talk in the Whitechapel Gallery programme ‘To Make a Tree’ was from Ivan Morrison (Heather was busy in rehearsals for their travelling puppet show tour of Wales)
A great raconteur Ivan presented an overview of their practise concentrating on key interests and their overriding belief in the importance of integrity of materials.
Making something have more depth by doing it the long way even if the end result looks the same, he strongly believes that the commitment to an object though a long making process imbues it with a value beyond the visual.
He is also a great believer in the importance of failure –  natural entropy. From the ashes of disaster…

He decided the best way of forming a direct engagement with nature within an urban environment was to become involved in gardening.
This involvement was to become one of his first projects; the documentation of his gardening experience in Birmingham.

Postcards were printed and sent out to selected people stating the progress of his gardening endeavours.

Heather and Ivan Morrison

Ivan Morrison

He listed the colours to be found in the garden at certain times of the year.

Ivan Morrison

Ivan Morrison

As time went on the success and more often the failures were documented in what became an ongoing narrative of the battle every gardener faces in order to maintain control and defy attack.

Ivan Morrison

Ivan Morrison

The Morrisons are inspired by the passions of other people, the importance of family and ancestors, of staking a claim in the soil by planting an arboretum tended through generations, or the spirit of the idealist who builds an escape vehicle on the back of a truck and heads for the open road.

Heather and Ivan Morrison Tales of Space and Time

Heather and Ivan Morrison ‘Tales of Space and Time’. Converted Bedford Green Goddess, Douglas Fir, books, other media

This idea of an escape vehicle became translated into other forms of refuge.

Heather and Ivan Morrison 'I am so sorry, Goodbye'

Heather and Ivan Morrison ‘I am so sorry, Goodbye’

Ivan Morison explains; ‘The conjoined domes of ‘I am so sorry. Goodbye.’ are inhabited by a guardian whose task it is to keep the stove lit, water boiled and visitors supplied with hibiscus tea. The guardian has the vocabulary of the words: I, am, so, sorry and goodbye. These words were first conveyed to us whilst staying in an old upmarket hotel on Alexandria’s corniche. Late one night I received a call in which the only words that were said, by the slow doleful male foreign voice, were ” I am so sorry sir… I am so sorry sir… Goodbye sir.” After putting the phone down I felt witness to something I didn’t fully understand, but felt that we had been given the task to pass on this cryptic message.’
The refuge is hand built from naturally fallen trees in Tatton Park. Made from its own environment it looks both archaic and futuristic. Dystopian or utopian it could come from any era. An apocalyptic future or the idealisms of a hippy commune. The Morrisons are interested in social architecture and how architecture impacts social behaviour. These thoughts are also influenced by science fiction and dystopian novels such as  J.G. Ballard’s 1975 novel, High-Rise. The idea of the building design having a direct effect on the social relationships of the inhabitants was part of the thought process for the Morrisons in creating a site specific structure ‘Plaza’ in Vancouver.

Heather and Ivan Morrison Plaza

Heather and Ivan Morrison Plaza

‘Plaza’ looks about to fall down. It is made of reclaimed dark heavy wood, burnt black. In contrast to the pale linear city it looks like the bones exposed at the moment of collapse.

A reminder of all the great cities that have fallen over time. It is an exciting place because it is dynamic. It creates a shift in perception.

The Maldives are facing a very direct impact on their environment from climate change, not a natural entropy.

Communities come together to build sandbanks to try to keep the sea at bay.

Portable Nation

Portable Nation

At the Venice Biennale the art collective Chamber of Public Secrets explored east west views of nature. Where western thought considers nature and culture to be in opposition, eastern thought considers nature as a guide, a source of inspiration and harmony.

Portable Nation

Portable Nation

For the pavilion they presented the culture and nature of the Maldives as one aesthetic experience in line with the concept of contemporary Environmental Romanticism.

Portable Nation

Portable Nation

The crumbling brickwork of the pavilion was a perfect backdrop to the video projections of nature giving an ethereal ghostlike quality to the images – a disappearing landscape.

Portable Nation

Portable Nation

For many the Maldives is synonymous with paradise.

Portable Nation

Portable Nation

A place for the western romantic to escape to has become a place that its own people want to escape from.

Portable Nation

Portable Nation

Simryn Gill for the Australian pavilion fully embraced entropy in her work.

Australian Pavillion

Australian Pavilion

‘Here art grows on trees’  allows the elements into the Pavilion.

The drawings of insects on paper made from the pulp of decayed plants will over the seasons return to a state of decay, exposed to the rain and sun and insects of the Giardini.

The work is about the passage through time of paper, the artwork, the pavilion, the artist.

Simryn Gill Eyes and Storms

Simryn Gill ‘Eyes and Storms’

Looking at cycles, at circles. Eyes and Storms are photographs of mines. Huge circles carved into the earth.

It will be interesting to see how the work has changed when I return in November with the RCA study trip.

Another artist undertaking a similar project at the moment is Matt Calderwood on the roof of the De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill.

Matt Calderwood Exposure Sculpture

Matt Calderwood Exposure Sculpture

The paper covered steel frames of ‘Exposure Sculpture’ will remain on the roof, at the mercy of the elements, over the summer period to be taken into the gallery and reconfigured later in the year.

Terike Haapoja in the Nordic Pavillion at the Biennale questioned the human view of nature and wanted to express the interdependency of all living things, the energy passing between us and through us.

Nordic Pavillion

Nordic Pavillion

By talking or breathing to the CO2 sensor next to a branch on the trees in the Pavilion the visitor can activate the lights and open the glass chambers.

Terike Haapoja

Terike Haapoja

Breathing together.

Nordic Pavillion

Nordic Pavillion

The loss of heat from a body at the moment of death is recorded. It is a poignant witness to the warmth of life slowly dispersing.

Terike Haapoja

Terike Haapoja

Thinking about the natural processes of life and death can lead to thoughts of the spiritual.

Our ancestors had other than scientific explanations for things they didn’t understand and believed in spirits.

Mark Leckey’s exhibition ‘The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things’  looks at the objects we interact with today in a similar vein. As things possessed.

His concept is of ‘techno-animism’ – the blurring of the animate and the inanimate.

Mark Leckey

Mark Leckey

At the Biennale a digital taster was showing of the main exhibition held at the De La Warr pavilion in Bexhill on Sea.

Mark Leckey at The De La Warr Pavilion

Mark Leckey at The De La Warr Pavilion

Felix the Cat – the first image ever transmitted on TV

Mark Leckey The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things

Mark Leckey The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things

The exhibition was presented as a collection of objects that all talk, literally or metaphorically, to each other.

Mark Leckey The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things

Mark Leckey The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things

I was interested in the backdrop image which is Piero di Cosimo The Forest Fire c1495-1508.

The painting is thought to show the birth of civilization as man gained supremacy over the animals through the use of fire and language.

Concerned with the history of early man, inspired by passages from Book 5 of De Rerum Natura by Lucretius (98–c.55 BC), who traces the origins of life on earth and the birth of community life, emphasizing the role of fire as a catalyst for change.

Roger Hiorns

Roger Hiorns

The machine encrusted with crystals making its original purpose defunct it becomes something else.

Nicola Hicks Maquette for Crouching Minotaur

Nicola Hicks Maquette for Crouching Minotaur

Imposing presence of a minotaur skull, a symbol of the unnatural. A monster created from desire that cannot be controlled.

Doesn’t feel impossible.

William Blake believed he was visited by spirits from other worlds in his imagination.

William Blake The Ghost of a Flea

William Blake The Ghost of a Flea

This is his record of the spirit of a flea which has undergone a demonic transformation inhabited by the souls of bloodthirsty men.

Possession.

At the Biennale in the Belgium pavilion Berlinde De Bruyckere created a mausoleum.

Berlinde De Bruyckere's 'Cripplewood'

Berlinde De Bruyckere’s ‘Cripplewood’

A tree is cast in wax, it is then traced with blood red veins and pink mottled flesh. A process of metamorphosis has begun.

Berlinde De Bruyckere's 'Cripplewood'

Berlinde De Bruyckere’s ‘Cripplewood’

Bound with what appears to be bloodied bandages and laying on its side, the trees limbs take on the fragile nature of the bones of a giant disfigured human corpse.

The circle of life, the exchange of energy is something that Lin Xue wanted to convey in his detailed fantastical landscape drawings made with sharpened bamboo and ink.

Lin Xue

Lin Xue

The “Treasuries of Knowledge” exhibition by Khaled Zaki and Muhammad Banaw for Egypt looked at the two cycles of the universe – the first infinite cycle of nature and the second cycle of humanity continuously walking the earth.

“Treasure of Knowledge”  Khaled Zaki and Muhammad Banaw

“Treasuries of Knowledge” Khaled Zaki and Muhammad Banaw

At the point where the two cycles overlap is the point of creation, of wisdom and where such mysteries as knowledge of the afterlife might be found.

Lara Almarcegui is also interested in renewal.

Lara Almarcegui

Lara Almarcegui

Working at the boundary of urban regeneration and natural decay she filled the Spanish pavilion with builders rubble.

Mirroring the unpredictable power of a landslide the mounds of rock look like they could keep pouring into the room.

There is a strong smell of brick dust also filling the space and adding to the slight sense of claustrophobia, that you might be trapped, or can’t breathe.

Lara Almarcegui

Lara Almarcegui

The mound of smashed glass though is quite seductive, it sparkles like ice. You want to make crunching footsteps over it and gather it up to see the light play on its shattered surface.

The materials of construction are presented in their raw form. Buildings mechanically broken down to be reused and dispersed into other landscapes.

Gina Soden’s painterly photographs on the other hand depict nature slowly reclaiming abandoned and derelict buildings left to ruin.

Gina Soden

Gina Soden

Showing at ‘Natural Selection’ at The Fine Art Society she captures the beauty of decay. There is a nostalgia here, a sense of the past crumbling away before us, returning to the earth.

Where Gina Soden looks at nature reclaiming ancient buildings, Paul Davies celebrates the dynamic juxtaposition of the clean lines of architecture in an organic setting.

Paul Davies

Paul Davies Modern Cathedral Invert

The balance of power between nature and the manmade is explored in his highly textured paintings of modernist buildings in dramatic landscapes.

The forest becomes the cathedral.

I was intrigued to find that the name for the unfurled heads of fern is shared by a Bishop’s staff of office – Crosier.

1308 Succession ve 1 1308 Succession ve 3 1308 Succession ve 6

I have finished this set of prints. The title is ‘Succession’.

As the ice retreats; from first life to ferns to first trees to forests to man to religion.

A few people have seen the prints now, the majority do not spot the embryos tucked in the furls of the fern unless I push them to look harder.

I like things to be hidden so I think it’s OK this is the case.

I also did some with more colour but am happiest with the grey tone ones.

1308 Succession ve 2 1308 Succession ve 4 1308 Succession ve 5